You can do it Sous Vide Miso Marinated Salmon

Most of us have heard the term, "sous vide", and thought to ourselves that it is to chef-ish of a term and we just don't want to mess with it in our home kitchen. After all, every time we see contestants of Chopped preparing a beautiful sous vide steak or delicate piece of fish, they are using bulky equipment that frankly most of us just don't have or care to have at home. I am here to tell you, YOU CAN DO IT without all of that stuff. Here's how I prepared a miso ginger marinated piece of wild caught salmon for dinner last night with as little as a plastic bag, digital thermometer, pot of water, and a little plan ahead.

Supplies:

  • stock pot deep enough to submerge your plastic bag into
  • digital thermometer
  • clip to secure your bag to the side of the pot
  • skewer or another clip to hold thermometer onto side of pot
  • plastic zip lock bag
  • vacuum sealer if you have one
  • cast iron skillet or stainless skillet for finishing salmon

Ingredients:

  • 4 (6 ounce) portions of salmon
  • 1/4 cup miso paste (white soybean paste usually sold in produce section of grocery store)
  • 1/4 cup mirin (this is a sweet Asian seasoning sold in Asian food aisle of store) Oh, and keep this refrigerated after opening. I made that mistake.
  • 2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce (low sodium is fine too)
  • 2 tablespoons freshly grated ginger
  • 2 teaspoons sesame oil
  • 2 tablespoons butter for finishing (olive oil can be subbed)

Directions:
Combine all marinade ingredients up to butter into a bowl and whisk until combined. Add salmon. At this point you can vacuum seal the bag if you have a contraption to do so. Otherwise seal bag and place in fridge to marinate for at least 30 minutes.

 This is the one I just got, well my husband surprised me with it.  Great for not only this application but also saving some $$$ by keeping food fresh!

This is the one I just got, well my husband surprised me with it.  Great for not only this application but also saving some $$$ by keeping food fresh!

Add water to your stockpot 3/4 full. Place your thermometer on the side with a skewer laid flat across the top and thermometer threaded through or clipped on the side. Using the air replacement method, place your OPEN zip lock bag into the water and submerge into the water pushing out air as it lowers being careful not to get water into bag. Secure top of bag to side of pot with clip. Heat water to 122 degrees F. Set your timer for 45 minutes, checking your thermometer regularly to ensure it stays around 122 degrees.

 Stockpot with water, thermometer probe over the side, and my little marinated salmon in a bag

Stockpot with water, thermometer probe over the side, and my little marinated salmon in a bag

Heat a cast iron or stainless skillet over medium high heat. Add butter. Turn off heat once butter is melted. Remove salmon from water and zip lock bag. Add to pan, tilting slightly to spoon butter over fish for about 2-3 minutes. Serve immediately.

 Finished product!  Those little things on top are coriander I threw in the butter while searing the salmon.  Not necessary by any means.  

Finished product!  Those little things on top are coriander I threw in the butter while searing the salmon.  Not necessary by any means.  

Side note: I would recommend having the fish monger remove the skin from your salmon or removing it yourself before marinating. As a person who loves fish skin, this particular dish works better without the skin.

Side Side Note: I paired this with some simple sides- carmalized chopped onions and chopped fennel in olive oil, added chopped garlic, fresh kale, and champagne vinegar and simmered while the salmon cooked. I made some barley simmered in chicken stock (homemade of course) and tossed that into my kale mixture just before serving.

Brandie Wininger

St. Louis, Missouri

Chef Owner of Nosh, LLC in St Louis.  Catering to corporate offices, private events, and private group cooking classes.  We use only the freshest ingredients and everything is made from scratch.  We pride ourselves in thinking outside of the typical lunch or dinner menu.